26
Aug
2014

The Hitting Jack-It Training System

The Hitting Jack-It Training System
From the earliest days of baseball, players have added heavy weights to their bats during batting practice to build strength and, in theory, get more power at the plate. From heavy bats and iron bars to crude lead donuts, players and trainers have tried everything to increase power and bat speed, not always with optimal results. Today’s baseball and softball players reap the benefits of 175 years of painstaking research with the development of the perfect batting practice system – Hitting Jack-It Training System.Professional hitting coaches and scientists now all agree that despite tradition and popular belief, practicing your swing with too much weight on the end of your bat can actually slow down your bat speed at the plate. The introduction of Hitting Jack-It Training System, a progressive, variable weighted training system for batting practice is changing behaviors at batting practices throughout the sport.The beauty of the Hitting Jack-It system is a player’s ability to hit...
28
Jul
2014

Unique-Sports: Pitching Aids

Unique-Sports: Pitching Aids
Having been practicing with my son and been a youth baseball coach for 15 years now, I have run across various baseball training aids and have mixed reviews on the effectiveness of them. I also see players struggle with various baseball skills and then run across a training aid that helps with it. One I ran into a few years ago is the Designated Hitter. The Designated Hitter is an approximately 5 foot 10 inch hitting dummy that will stand in the batters box for the pitcher to use during their bullpen session or pre-game warm ups. ...
17
Jun
2014

Unique Perspective: Practice Pitching Mounds

Unique Perspective: Practice Pitching Mounds
In the last few years I have discovered the benefits of using a practice portable pitching mound. A regulation high school or professional pitching mound is to be raised 10 inches higher than home plate. A practice-pitching mound is only raised 4 inches above home plate (or ground level). The dimensions of a typical practice-pitching mound are 4 inches high by 3 feet deep by 3 feet wide. You can get “game” portable pitching mounds much closer to the regulation dimensions of a real pitching mound, however the big difference between these and a practice mound is price. A practice mound can be purchased in the $300-$400 range and a portable game pitching mound will be in the $800-$3,000 price range. ...
12
May
2013

Indoor practice mounds, cold weather state necessary evil

Purchasing an indoor practice pitching mound is a very large investment.  Most successful youth, high school, or college programs have these mounds for indoor practice.  If you are fortunate enough to be in a warmer weather state you can invest this money elsewhere, however in those cold weather states it is a necessary evil!  A good indoor practice mound will cost a program over $1,000, but as pitchers get older it is very critical when they are practicing pitching they use a mound.  Practicing pitching in the off-season is critical and to properly work on mechanics you need to pitch off of a mound.  It is typical that at the age of 13 kids will start pitching off mounds for games.  Up until that point they are throwing off of flat ground, so an indoor mound is not necessary.  Once a child starts using a mound, throwing off flat ground is not nearly as effective.  Simulating throwing "downhill" off the mound for practice is critical.  It...